Blood and body fluids may contain pathogens, such as Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), or Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

What is an exposure?

  • Needle stick or cut from sharp object contaminated with blood and, or body fluid.
  • Blood or body fluid contact with broken skin such as open cut, wound, or dermatitis.
  • Blood or body fluid contact with mucous membrane such as eyes, nose and mouth.

What to do if there is an exposure

  1. Wash single-use gloves prior to handling or dressing the wound.
  2. Wash the exposed skin surface with water and soap. If the area is bleeding, allow it to bleed freely. After cleaning the wound, apply a skin antiseptic and cover with a clean dressing or bandage.
  3. If there has been a splash onto a mucous membrane such as eyes, nose or mouth, flush the area thoroughly with water.
  4. The person exposed must immediately contact a physician.
  5. Document all incidents and keep records on site for one year and on file for five years. Document the following information when there has been an exposure:
    • Full name (first and last), mailing address and phone number of the person exposed
    • Full name (first and last) of Personal Service Worker involved in the incident
    • Date of injury and exposure
    • Details of the exposure including where on the body the injury or exposure occurred and how the injury or exposure occurred
    • Action taken
  6. Clean all exposed equipment to remove organic material. Disinfect equipment using the appropriate level of disinfection.

Source: Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Infection Prevention and Control Best Practices for Personal Services Settings, January 2009

Accidental Exposure Recording Form

Business name and location:

Date of Incident (Date/Month/Year)Exposed Person's Full Name, Address, Phone numberDetails of Accidental ExposureAction TakenName of Personal Service Worker involved in Exposure










January 2013